Reports On How Nigerian Governors Of All The 36 States Performed In Their Midterm

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This reports on the performance of all state governors of all 36 states was compiled by ThisDay Newspaper correspondents from 36 states, where governors were sworn-in two years ago, show that despite revenue sources comprising FAAC allocations, internally generated revenue, and extra-statutory disbursements (federal government bailouts), the economic recession, rising unemployment and crime, mounting debts, and unmet wage and pension obligations characterized governance in most of the states. Graphics provided by BudgIT

Abia State

Okezie Ikpeazu: FINDING HIS

FEET AFTER COURT DEBACLES

Buffeted by several legal tussles, Abia State Governor, Dr. Okezie Ikpeazu, is just settling into his job with the affirmation of his mandate by the Supreme Court a few weeks ago. He ascended to power, promising to renew the commercial city of Aba by rehabilitating its collapsed infrastructure for its huge concentration of small and medium enterprises (SMEs).

Getting it right in Aba, for Ikpeazu, translates to getting it right in the state as he hopes to use the internally generated revenue from it to build the rest of the state. He has been focused on that with his massive rehabilitation of roads in the commercial city. He has added to that, the promotion of made-in-Aba products, including investors from China on a proposed investment of $1.5 billion in shoes.

The governor also made some in-roads in agriculture as the state has focused on laying the foundation of becoming a major source of palm produce in a few years time by planting more than two million oil palm seedlings.

Despite Ikpeazu’s best efforts to diversify his state’s economy, Abia State’s internally generated revenue dropped by almost N700 million between 2015 and 2016, reflecting a state who’s human and natural resources remained largely untapped.

The governor is also yet to fulfil his promise to pay workers’ salary on the 24th of every month because of revenue constraints. It is also hamstrung by pension liabilities running into billions of naira, as such, the state has an unpaid wage bill running into several months.

Like several states in the country, Ikpeazu also had to contend with rising crime in the form of kidnappings and armed robberies, especially in the southern part of the state. This was not helped by mounting protests by pro-Biafra agitators in Abia, being the home state of Nnamdi Kanu, leader of the Indigenous People of Biafra. Most of these protests, sometimes violent, resulted in clashes with security forces and the death, arrest and detention of scores of people in Abia.

ABIA IN FIGURES

• FAAC Allocation (June 2015 – May 2016)  N35.18bn

• FAAC Allocation (June 2016 – April 2017)  N33.31bn

• IGR in 2015 N13.35bn

• IGR in 2016 N12.69bn

Total Debt Stock as at Dec 31, 2016  N66.12bn

SECTORAL ASSESSMENT

• Agriculture: Ikpeazu has laid the blueprint for palm production and processing, targeting 2m oil seedlings – Average

• Education: Accomplishment in this area has been limited – Poor

• Health Care: Accomplishment in health facilities also limited – Poor

• Infrastructure: Emphasis laid on rehabilitating the state’s commercial nerve centre, Aba – Good

• Ease of Doing Business: Revamping Aba to attract investors and assisting artisans and traders in the city Above – Good

• Security: Resurgence in kidnappings and armed robberies – Below Average

work in progress, no clear results:

Adamawa State

Mohammed Bindow: the state

needs more than a common touch

Senator Mohammed Bindow has made some progress in Adamawa State during his two years in the saddle as governor. Dusting off the debilitating effects of the Boko Haram insurgency, he has focused on urban renewal projects, addressing the humanitarian crisis in the state, and rehabilitation of towns and cities impacted by the insurgency.

This has led to the construction of several roads and streets lights, making life in the state capital, Yola, and Mubi, the second largest town in the state, more bearable for their residents. He has also been at work, constructing roads in the rural areas that add economic value to the state. Shelleng, Woru-Jebba, Yolde-Pete and township roads in Numan, Ganye, among others are nearing completion.

Bindow has trained more than 500 youths in various skills acquisition even as education, health and agriculture, especially rice production, have also received his attention.

But a lot still needs to be done in the areas of health care delivery, education and job creation, if he must develop the human capital in a state that remains largely backward. The governor is equally challenged by herdsmen attacks and the backlog of salaries of teachers, local government staff, health workers and pensioners, largely piled up by the previous administration.

Adamawa’s total debt relative to its revenue also portrayed a state with severe fiscal constraints under the Bindow administration.

adamawa IN FIGURES

• FAAC Allocation (June 2015 – May 2016)  N34.06bn

• FAAC Allocation (June 2016 – April 2017)  N32.11bn

• IGR in 2015 N4.45bn

• IGR in 2016 N5.79bn

• Total Debt Stock as at Dec 31, 2016 N87.7bn

SECTORAL ASSESSMENT

• Agriculture: Has received attention, especially rice production – Average

• Education: Skills acquisition programmes for youths – Average

• Health Care: Accomplishment in health facilities limited – Poor

• Infrastructure: Emphasis laid on rehabilitating the state’s infrastructure destroyed by Boko Haram – Slightly Above Average

• Ease of Doing Business: The insurgency has made Adamawa an unattractive investment destination – Poor

• Security: Menace of herdsmen and Boko Haram terrorists – Poor

work in progress, no clear results:

Akwa Ibom State

Udom Emmanuel:

Consolidating infrastructure

Governor Udom Emmanuel came into office with a five-point agenda focusing on wealth creation; economic and political inclusion; poverty alleviation; infrastructure consolidation; and expansion and job creation. Udom’s best efforts, however, have been targeted at infrastructure development. He has completed over 250km of roads, while progress is being made on over 500km of roads and 17 bridges across the three senatorial districts of the state.

Similarly, more than 400 rural development projects across the 31 local government areas of the state are also being executed. Udom has also focused on rural electrification. His other signature projects include the proposed automobile assembly plant in Itu, the LED industry in Itam, a metering factory in Onna, the coconut plantation and refinery in the Mkpat-Enin, Ikot Abasi and eastern Obolo axis, a petrochemical/jetty project in Ibeno, and the second runway at the Ibom airport.

He has also secured 450 hectares of land in 15 local government areas for agriculture, supplying improved oil palm and cocoa seedlings to farmers as well as promoting cassava plantations.

He is developing the capacity of the people with 450 youths already trained in cocoa processing, 1,000 in Oracle database management and 100 in mechanised agriculture in Israel.

Yet, for a state that is the largest oil producer in the country and received the most from FAAC allocations and bailout funds in the last two years, its pace of development belies the revenue that has accrued to the state. Nonetheless, mention must be made of Emmanuel’s effort to almost double internally generated revenue from N14.79 billion in 2015 to N23.27 billion in 2016. Prior to 2016, Akwa Ibom’s IGR relative to other big oil producing states such as Rivers and Delta was disappointingly negligible as a percentage of total revenue.

But the state’s rising debt stock needs to be watched. Although Akwa Ibom gets considerable revenue from the centre, alarm bells are beginning to go off, raising doubts about the state’s march towards self-sustainability.

akwa ibom IN FIGURES

• FAAC Allocation (June 2015 – May 2016) N133.85bn

• FAAC Allocation (June 2016 – April 2017) 117.68bn

• IGR in 2015 N14.79bn

• IGR in 2016 N23.27bn

• *Debt Stock – $115m as at Dec 2016; N155.43bn as at June 2016

* Figure denominated in dollars is the state’s external debt stock

SECTORAL ASSESSMENT

• Agriculture: Getting the right attention – Good

• Education: Skills acquisition programmes for youths – Above Average

• Health Care: Opening of Specialists Hospital in Uyo – Good

• Infrastructure: Considerable investment in roads, bridges and rural electrification and development – Good

• Ease of Doing Business: With emphasis on urban renewal projects, this is attracting investment in the state – Above Average

• Security: Relative peace in the state, but kidnapping is a problem – Average

clear vision, promising start:

Anambra State

William Obiano: improving

the business climate, but…

Although William Obiano will be ending his first term in office this year and is seeking re-election in November, the governor has placed emphasis on urban renewal projects, especially with the three flyovers in Awka. Onitsha, the state’s commercial nerve centre, and Nnewi are equally being revamped to attract investors. He has also invested heavily in rural roads in the state, clearing of drainages and waterways.

Obiano has added new units to the Onitsha General Hospital and has built a helipad for air ambulances for emergency cases. He has also built several blocks of houses that will serve as Isolation Units in cases of epidemics. The complex has been designated as the Centre for Tropical Disease Control.

In education, however, Obiano has been lagging. Anambra, which used to come first in SSCE examinations under the Peter Obi administration, now ranks seventh to ninth position under the Obiano administration.

There is little or any known agriculture policy started by his administration that has worked. In fact, some projects like the Coscharis Farms projects and some others started in partnership with some private firms, have collapsed or are on the verge of collapse.

Obiano, however, has done relatively well in trying to change Anambra’s notoriety for being the theatre of crime and criminality in the South-east. He launched an all-out war against kidnappers, armed robbers, drug-dealers and child-traffickers. He has also invested in and donated cars and a helicopter to assist the police keep criminality in check, while a gunboat was provided to the Nigerian Navy.

Anambra under Obiano has managed to keep its debt profile low, however, more work needs to be done to improve internal revenue, given its low allocations from the Federation Account.

ANAMBRA IN FIGURES

• FAAC Allocation (June 2015 – May 2016)  N36.00bn

• FAAC Allocation (June 2016 – April 2017)  N33.84bn

• IGR in 2015 N14.79bn

• IGR in 2016 NA

• Total Debt Stock as at Dec 31, 2016 N23.17bn

SECTORAL ASSESSMENT

• Agriculture: Little attention has been paid to agriculture – Poor

• Education: Standards have fallen under Obiano – Below Average

• Health Care: Health care has been a priority – Above Average

• Infrastructure: Considerable investment in roads, bridges and rural electrification and development – Good

• Ease of Doing Business: With emphasis on revamping Onitsha and Nnewi, the goal is to attract more businesses to the state – Above Average

• Security: Relative peace in the state – Good

good vision, slow start:

Bauchi State

Mohammed Abubakar:

all motion, no movement

Despite disagreements with federal legislators from his state, Mohammed Abubakar, the Bauchi governor, has been struggling to deal with some infrastructure challenges left behind by his predecessor, especially in the education sector.

Confronted by the rot in the educational sector, Abubakar increased the sector’s share of the state budget to 20 per cent, and appointed his deputy, Mr. Nuhu Gidado, to oversee the affairs of the Ministry of Education.

The governor’s stay in office has also been marked by improvement in water supply to which he also dedicated a huge chunk of the state budget. Today, an estimated 700,000 people have improved access to safe drinking water through the construction of 1,652 hand pump boreholes and 34 motorised powered schemes, while about 30,000 school children have access to safe drinking water and effective sanitation in 42 schools.

Similarly, about 1.7 million people from over 2,000 Open Defecation Free certified communities have increased access to sanitation and improved hygiene practices.

But Abubakar’s administration is challenged by paucity of funds, forcing him to tackle its bloated wage bill. This has come at a cost, as workers groan under the yoke of persistent verification exercises that seem unending. His is also one of several states contending with a backlog of unpaid wages and bloated pension liabilities. Even more alarming is the debt overhang Abubakar has had to contend with, making Bauchi an unviable sub-national unit of the federation.

bauchi IN FIGURES

• FAAC Allocation (June 2015 – May 2016) N38.69bn

• FAAC Allocation (June 2016 – April 2017) N36.31bn

• IGR in 2015 N5.39bn

• IGR in 2016 N8.67bn

• Total Debt Stock as at Dec 31, 2016 N99.63bn

SECTORAL ASSESSMENT

• Agriculture: Limited impact for now compared to neighbouring state – Average

• Education: State’s education budget increased to 20% of total budget – Average

• Health Care: Limited impact due to paucity of funds – Poor

• Infrastructure: Limited impact due to paucity of funds– Poor

• Ease of Doing Business: Threat of insurgency in North-east has deterred investments – Poor

• Security: Infiltration by Boko Haram remains a threat – Poor

non-starter, go back to drawing board:

Bayelsa State

Seriake Dickson: improved healthcare, challenging security environment

Continuing from where he left off after his first term, Seriake Dickson in the last 17 months has expended resources in repositioning education in Bayelsa State. With his policy on free and compulsory education at the primary and secondary school levels, the governor has devoted resources building model schools across the state. Bayelsa under his watch continues to pick the bills for students registering for WAEC, NECO, and JAMB examinations, and has provided scholarships to enable Bayelsans and other Ijaw-speaking peoples study for graduate and post-graduate degrees in universities in Nigeria and overseas.

Dickson has also tackled teacher education, which had been neglected for many years due to inconsistent government policies.

In the same vein, the governor has focused on infrastructure projects such as roads in the state capital, Yenagoa, to ease the gridlock in the city, while roads to open up communities outside the capital have also received attention. Water transportation for communities in the creeks has equally been upgraded to reduce accidents in the state’s waterways.


Dickson, however, has struggled to pay the salaries of his workers and pensioners, while the menace of militancy, kidnappings and cultism have risen appreciably in the last one year in the state. The governor is now trying to tackle the crime wave in his state through skills empowerment programmes and has embraced the federal government’s modular refinery projects for the Niger Delta to create jobs for his people.

Of the four major oil producing states in the country, Bayelsa continues to remain the laggard in all spheres of development, and this has been evident in the state’s IGR, which dropped to N7.9 billion in 2016. The state’s FAAC allocations also dropped significantly in 2016 due to a combination of low oil prices and militant attacks on oil and gas infrastructure, while its debt to foreign and local creditors grew.

bayelsa IN FIGURES

• FAAC Allocation (June 2015 – May 2016) N70.31bn

• FAAC Allocation (June 2016 – April 2017) N90.89bn

• IGR in 2015 N8.71bn

• IGR in 2016 N7.9bn

• Total Debt Stock as at Dec 31, 2016 N152.15bn

SECTORAL ASSESSMENT

• Agriculture: Limited impact for now– Poor

• Education: Education has been given priority – Good

• Health Care: Health care facilities have been improved – Average

• Infrastructure: Roads and water transportation improved upon – Good

• Ease of Doing Business: The oil economy remains a magnet for Bayelsa, but effort still needed to attract investors – Average

• Security: Crime wave in Bayelsa has not been checked – Poor

work in progress, no clear results:

Benue State

Samuel Ortom: despite bailout, still owing salaries for over 12 months

For Samuel Ortom, the last two years have been quite disappointing, fighting off incessant attacks by Hausa-Fulani herdsmen at a time he needed to urgently fulfil his inaugural promise to develop infrastructure and improve on social amenities in the state. Also on his plate was the challenge of non-payment of pensioners and workers, as well as the need to bring down the high rate of crime in the state.

Mid-way into his tenure, his stay in office has been characterised by crises that have been almost overwhelming and deterred him from tapping into the potential of Benue State as the food basket of the nation. Indeed, Ortom has been forced to admit that inadequate resources have impeded his capacity to deliver on his mandate. With monthly allocations from Abuja hovering around N2.5 billion a month, against a monthly wage bill of N3.7 billion, it is little wonder that Makurdi has remained a bundle of disappointment, earning the governor the recent unenviable sobriquet of “wheel barrow governor”.

Although insecurity and unpaid salaries remain the bane of his government, he has tried to make some headway in universal basic education. There also appears to be a silver lining in the horizon, as the enactment of the Anti-Open Grazing Bill may serve as a deterrent to marauding herdsmen that have threatened to completely displace farmers in the state.

Benue IN FIGURES

• FAAC Allocation (June 2015 – May 2016) N35.30bn

• FAAC Allocation (June 2016 – April 2017) N35.32bn

• IGR in 2015 N7.36bn

• IGR in 2016 N9.56bn

• Total Debt Stock as Dec 31, 2016 N75.12bn

SECTORAL ASSESSMENT

• Agriculture: Limited impact in the state that should be food basket of Nigeria – Average

• Education: Basic education has given priority – Average

• Health Care: Limited impact due to paucity of funds – Poor

• Infrastructure: Limited impact due to paucity of funds, Seeking Chines loan to build cagro airport – Average

• Ease of Doing Business – Poor

• Security: Herdsmen menace, Communal crisis and kidnappings remain unchecked  – Poor

non-starter, go back to drawing board:

Borno State

Kashim Shettima: blighted by boko

haram crisis, limited governance

Kashim Shettima, an agricultural economist, former lecturer and banker, is perhaps the best brain to govern Borno State. He came into office six years ago looking prepared with a master plan for the state. But the Boko Haram insurgency in the North-east has been a pain in the neck for him as the terrorists have made development of his state near impossible. This has been compounded by the humanitarian crisis and over 2 million displaced persons that have put a major strain on the state’s finances.

With the insurgency now abating, Shettima is settling down to the work, focusing on reconstruction, rehabilitation and resettlement. Already, quite a bit has been achieved by his government, working in over 20 different sites. Many devastated communities have been rehabilitated to meet certain standards: schools, district heads, palaces, central mosques, primary healthcare centres, and water supply boreholes destroyed by the insurgents have been re-built.

Equally rebuilt are housing estates, police quarters, general hospitals and dispensaries, local government secretariats, police stations and barracks, and other public buildings that were destroyed by Boko Haram.

Still, Borno remains a shadow of its former self and is a long way off from where it should be. Shettima continues to be faced with periodic bombings and an asymmetrical warfare waged by remnants of the insurgents, rendering his state an unattractive investment destination for businesses that could pool desperately needed resources and create jobs for the masses.

The food and humanitarian crisis in the state is of major concern that has attracted global calls for serious interventions to cater to the over three million displaced persons in the state. The only way out for Borno, which has been at the epicenter of the insurgency, is massive aid from internal and external donors. But for this to happen, greater transparency in the way monies pouring in for the reconstruction of the state is utilised must be guaranteed.

Borno IN FIGURES

• FAAC Allocation (June 2015 – May 2016) N42.65bn

• FAAC Allocation (June 2016 – April 2017) N39.33bn

• IGR in 2015 N3.53bn

• IGR in 2016 N2.68bn

• Total Debt Stock as at Dec 31, 2016 N37.66bn

SECTORAL ASSESSMENT

• Agriculture: Limited impact for now – Poor

• Education: Education is being given priority – Average

• Health Care: Health care is being given priority – Average

• Infrastructure: Reconstruction and rehabilitation is ongoing – Above Average

• Ease of Doing Business: Suicide bombings serve as a deterrent for businesses – Poor

• Security: Boko Haram still not completely checked; Shettima remains reliant on the Armed Forces to wipeout remnants of the insurgency  – Poor

work in progress, no clear results:

Cross River State

Ben Ayade: more

talk, little action

With the economic downturn, Ben Ayade of Cross River State set for himself the task of wealth creation through aggressive industrialisation and the provision of infrastructure. Under him, he has set about taking on rather ambitious projects, some which include the 260km super highway, 148km Nfum-Ogoja-Obudu Ranch Road, Eastern Boki-Western Boki Link Road, Bakassi Deep Seaport, Cross River Garment Factory; Calabar Pharmaceutical and Cosmetic Company, Calabar International Convention Centre (CICC), Calabar Rice City, and the Calabar Monorail.

He is also building a 32MW power plant in the state capital, Calabar, which is almost complete and promises to give the capital 24 hours uninterrupted power supply.

In addition, his administration has secured a $30 million Indian loan for another 26MW as well as the installation of 4MW power turbines in Obudu Local Government Area.

Yet, anyone who has encountered Ayade will admit that he is a big talker and has limited resources to deliver on several of these projects. The debt profile of the state, much of which was handed by Ayade’s predecessors, shows that debt service as a percentage of revenue is unsustainable.

Cross Rivers IN FIGURES

• FAAC Allocation (June 2015 – May 2016) N27.80bn

• FAAC Allocation (June 2016 – April 2017) N27.56bn

• IGR in 2015 N13.57bn

• IGR in 2016 N14.78bn

• Total Debt Stock as at Dec 31, 2016 N163.22bn

SECTORAL ASSESSMENT

• Agriculture: Limited impact for now– Above Average

• Education: Education has been given priority – Average

• Health Care: Health care facilities have been improved – Average

• Infrastructure: Has laid blueprint for ambitious projects, but is yet to deliver on them – Average

• Ease of Doing Business: Though there is peace, Ayade needs policies that attract investment  – Below Average

• Security: Peace has prevailed in Cross River but kidnapping is on the rise  – Above Average

work in progress, no clear results:

Delta State

Ifeanyi Okowa: calm,

prudent and determined

Ifeanyi Okowa has made progress with his SMART Agenda standing for: Strategic wealth creation projects and provision of jobs; Meaningful peace building platforms aimed at political and social harmony; Agricultural reforms and accelerated industrialisation; Relevant health and education policies; and Transformed environment through urban renewal.

Under SMART, the Delta State governor has upgraded over 1,000 primary schools, 475 secondary schools and three technical colleges. Two of the three campuses of the state-owned Delta State University, Abraka and Oleh, have also been given a face-lift. With 65 hospitals and over 200 functional health centres, the health sector has also received significant attention, while the inauguration of the upgraded Abavo and Patani hospitals in 2016 was a significant milestone in the health sector.

In two years, the governor has pumped over N35 billion into the construction of roads across the three senatorial zones of the state, particularly in Delta North and Central districts, with over 130km of roads constructed or rehabilitated. In Asaba, the state capital, urban renewal is apace with several roads under rehabilitation. Appreciable progress has also been made on the construction of the Asaba drainage system project.

However, insecurity remained a drawback in the state with the herdsmen menace, particularly in Delta North and Central zones. Okowa also faced the onerous task of resurgent militant attacks on oil and gas infrastructure much of last year, which impacted negatively on the state’s finances, as reduced crude oil production from Delta State translated into lower derivation from the Federation Account. Although peace appears to have been restored, Delta remains the most volatile oil producing state in the Niger Delta.

The state’s debt profile was also a cause for concern in the two years Okowa has been in the saddle. With the volatility in the oil markets and attendant lower FAAC allocations, this means that the governor has to expand his internal revenue base through diverse sources other than PAYE for the state to remain viable.

DELTA IN FIGURES

• FAAC Allocation (June 2015 – May 2016) N101.77bn

• FAAC Allocation (June 2016 – April 2017) N86.27bn

• IGR in 2015 N40.81bn

• IGR in 2016 N44.06bn

• Total Debt Stock as at Dec 31, 2016 N254.14bn

SECTORAL ASSESSMENT

• Agriculture: Limited impact for now– Below Average

• Education: Education has been given major priority – Good

• Health Care: Health care facilities have been of topmost priority under Okowa – Good

• Infrastructure: Urban renewal and road construction projects have been felt statewide – Good

• Ease of Doing Business: The oil economy remains a magnet for Delta, but effort still needed to attract investors in other sectors – Above Average

• Security: Although militancy has been checked, kidnappings and attacks by herdsmen are yet to be curtained –Below Average

clear vision, promising start:

Ebonyi State

David Umahi: The rice

merchant of the east

David Umahi has focused on infrastructure development in his state. With three new flyovers in Abakaliki and road construction in other parts of the state, his people appear to be happy with his stewardship halfway into his tenure. He is also empowering youths in his state, taking over 4,000 unemployed youths and hawkers off the streets through the N250, 000 empowerment scheme.

Umahi’s focus on agriculture has also catapulted his state into one worth watching. Abakaliki rice, which for many years disappeared as a food staple on many people’s tables in the South-east, has witnessed a major resurgence under the governor’s stewardship and has helped to push the down the price of this important food staple in the region. Increasing from 120 metric tonnes of rice processed daily, output today stands at 180 metric tonnes, with room to process more because of increased patronage.

However, Umahi has to place more emphasis on this area of comparative advantage by attracting more investors into his state to set up state-of-art rice processing mills and incentivising paddy rice farmers, so that output can increase from the current 260,000 metric tonnes per annum. Although Umahi has targeted 350,000 metric tonnes of rice by the end of the year, he should set his sights on 1-2 million metric tonnes before the end of his tenure. That would give his state a first mover’s advantage in terms of cornering market share in a country with an estimated rice consumption of 6 million metric tonnes per annum.

His is also a handful of states that has made his workers happy, because in spite of the economic downturn, their salaries are paid as and when due. The governor has equally focused on projects in the urban and rural areas of his state by building roads, making pipe borne water more readily accessible, and in beautification projects in Abakiliki, the state capital. But by stopping the contributory pension scheme, workers in his state are certain to face an uncertain fate upon retirement, effectively increasing poverty and putting pressure on health, housing and other social amenities in the state.

Furthermore, a lot is left to be desired in the provision of improved health care facilities and education in Ebonyi. Equally disconcerting is the rising crime wave and herdsmen who have infiltrated his state.

In the area of internal revenue generation, Umahi has also taken his finger off the pulse as data provided by the National Bureau of Statistics shows that IGR has dropped precipitously under his watch from N2.3 billion in 2011, rising to N8.2 billion in 2012, rising again to N10.4 billion in 2013, improving to N11 billion in 2015, holding steady at N11 billion in 2015, then crashing inexplicably to N2.34 billion in 2016. Could the sharp decline have been as a result of the recession, or are there gapping leakages in Ebonyi that Umahi must block? For a state that gets FAAC allocations that average about N2.5 billion a month, revenue drive from diverse sources is an area that must be improved upon.

EBONYI  IN FIGURES

• FAAC Allocation (June 2015 – May 2016)

• FAAC Allocation (June 2016 – April 2017)

• IGR in 2015 N11bn

• IGR in 2016 N2.34bn

• Total Debt Stock as at Dec 31, 2016 N42.20bn

SECTORAL ASSESSMENT

• Agriculture: Production of Abakaliki rice has risen considerable and is now a staple in the South-east  – Above Average

• Education: Impact in education has been limited – Below Average

• Health Care: Impact in health has been limited – Below Average

• Infrastructure: Urban and rural projects have been emphasized to disperse development in the state  – Above Average

• Ease of Doing Business: Umahi is putting the right policies in place to attract investments in agri-processing in his state – Good

• Security: Rising attacks by herdsmen still not completely checked – Below Average

good vision, slow start:

Edo State

Godwin Obaseki:

off to a flying start

Although Godwin Obaseki has been in the saddle for less than one year, he place special emphasis on the enforcement of Edo State’s town planning laws in order to rollout projects that can transform the state. Since assumption of office, he completed roads and drainages across all the senatorial districts. He has commenced work on Luck Way in Benin City, while Textile Mill Road in Egor Local Government Area, Benin, has been earmarked for reconstruction; the contract for the first central bus terminal in Edo State has also been awarded, while the state secretariat has undergone rehabilitation. Benin City, especially the city centre, under the governor’s watch is also been revamped through a cleanup and beautification programme, while education is receiving major priority.

In the area of agriculture, Obaseki is keen on resuscitating the rubber and palm plantations in conjunction with the private sector, in order to increase the state’s GDP, while the state government has rolled out a plan to leverage on the University of Benin’s power plant to drive the development of an industrial park within Benin Technical College. The goal is to create a ‘Silicon Valley’ to boost technology in the state.

Obaseki has equally placed a premium on developing Edo’s tourism potential through arts and crafts and leveraging on the state’s rich cultural heritage.

Though Obaseki inherited a state where worker’s salaries were up to date and its internal revenue generation improved in 2016, the state’s foreign debt stock put at $183.64 million as at December 31, 2016, was worrisome. With the devaluation of the naira, Obaseki would have to triple revenue in the state to sustain debt service in the years to come.

edo IN FIGURES

• FAAC Allocation (June 2015 – May 2016) N37.20bn

• FAAC Allocation (June 2016 – April 2017) N31.68bn

• IGR in 2015 N19.12bn

• IGR in 2016 N23.04bn

• Total Debt Stock as at Dec 31, 2016 N101.10bn

SECTORAL ASSESSMENT

• Agriculture: Plan in place to increase rubber and palm produce  – Above Average

• Education: Impact in education is being felt especially in technical education – Above Average

• Health Care: Impact in health is being felt – Above Average

• Infrastructure: Urban and rural projects have been emphasized to disperse development in the state  – Good

• Ease of Doing Business: Obaseki is putting the right policies in place to attract investments in his state – Average

• Security: Rising attacks by herdsmen and kidnappings need to be checked – Below Average

good vision, flying start:

Ekiti State

Ayodele Fayose:

mr. controversies

Carrulous Ayodele Fayose has since assuming office in 2014 continued with his policy on “stomach infrastructure”, hence the priority given by his administration to youth and small business empowerment programmes through direct cash injections. Community-based projects with grassroots impact have also been pursued by the governor with vigour. These include water projects, rural electrification, equipping primary health care centres and rural roads. Though this has endeared him to the people at the grassroots, workers in the public sector in Ekiti continue to cry out over unpaid wages, while pensioners wallow in poverty.

On a larger scale, he has taken on some legacy infrastructure projects such as the flyover in Ado-Ekiti, the state capital and dualisation of the Ado-Ikere Road. Others include dualisation of the Ijero Township Road and Ilawe Road, among others. In the area of agriculture, Fayose has unfolded a plan to boost cocoa farming and processing by private sector companies to create jobs in the state. He has also taken on marauding cattle headers in his state though the enactment of an Anti-Open Grazing Bill. The aim is to protect farmlands in Ekiti and improve agriculture output from the state, while at the same time curbing kidnappings and other vices associated with herdsmen.

Fayose’s state is, however, one of the poorest in the country as evidenced by its allocations from the Federation Account and IGR. Coupled with its debt profile, Ekiti is one of the unviable sub-national units of the federation.

EKITI  IN FIGURES

• FAAC Allocation (June 2015 – May 2016) N27.02bn

• FAAC Allocation (June 2016 – April 2017) N26.21bn

• IGR in 2015 N3.29bn

• IGR in 2016 N2.99bn

• Total Debt Stock as at Dec 31, 2016 N102.4bn

SECTORAL ASSESSMENT

• Agriculture: Plan in place to increase cocoa production and processing; farmlands have been secured since the menace of herdsmen was curtailed  – Above Average

• Education: Impact in education is being felt – Average

• Health Care: Impact in health is being felt at the grassroots – Average

• Infrastructure: Urban and rural projects have been emphasized to disperse development in the state  – Average

• Ease of Doing Business: There is no clarity on what Fayose is doing to attract investments to his state – Poor

• Security: Attacks by herdsmen and kidnappings have been curtailed – Good

work in progress, no clear results:

EEnugu State

Ifeanyi Ugwuanyi:

calm and measured

Ifeanyi Ugwuanyi’s achievements cut across different sectors, especially in road construction, construction of classroom blocks, job creation, and health care delivery. Workers in his state also sleep easy as salaries are guaranteed at the end of every month.

Perhaps, the biggest challenge for Ugwuanyi’s administration remains the recession, which impacted significantly on his ability to deliver on his projects. Despite the challenge, the governor has been widely acclaimed as the best performing governor among his peers in the South-east.

Ugwuanyi also held the maiden Enugu Investment Summit, during which his government showcased the economic potentials of the state and wooed investors to take up 14 moribund state-owned industries under the state’s commercialisation and privatisation programme. But it remains to be seen if the summit has had the desired effect.

Another area of focus has been the empowerment scheme for traders with N60 million annually to be won by 1,200 traders. This includes approved funds for the active participation of the state in the implementation of a N2 billion Staple Crops Processing Zone (SCPZ) agricultural programme of the federal government and African Development Bank.

After the Ukabi Nimbo community in Enugu State was attacked by suspected herdsmen in 2016, leading to several deaths, Ugwuanyi worked with security forces to curb further incursions into farmlands and prevent reprisals against Hausa-Fulani residents in his state. He also met with the Miyetti Allah to entrench peace and designated the routes to be used by genuine cattle herders.

Like his counterpart in Ebonyi, Ugwuanyi must improve internal revenue generation, which dropped from a peak of N20.2 billion in 2013 to N14.24 billion in 2016, reflecting the debilitating impact of the recession. In addition, for a state that boasts the capital of the defunct East Central State, much more is expected in terms internal revenue generation from Ugwuanyi. It is not enough to be acclaimed the “best performing governor in the South-east”, if his state’s finances are under strain.

enugu IN FIGURES

• FAAC Allocation (June 2015 – May 2016) N35.27bn

• FAAC Allocation (June 2016 – April 2017) N32.68bn

• IGR in 2015 N18.08bn

• IGR in 2016 N14.24bn

• Total Debt Stock as at Dec 31, 2016 N70.86bn

SECTORAL ASSESSMENT

• Agriculture: After the Ukpabi Nimbo attack, Ugwanyi moved to protect farmlands in Enugu State – Average

• Education: Impact in education is being felt – Above Average

• Health Care: Impact in health is being felt – Above Average

• Infrastructure: Strong in infrastructure development  – Good

• Ease of Doing Business: Efforts to attract investments through privatisation and commercialization – Good

• Security: Attacks by herdsmen have been curtailed – Above Average

clear vision, promising start:

enugu IN FIGURES

• FAAC Allocation (June 2015 – May 2016) N35.27bn

• FAAC Allocation (June 2016 – April 2017) N32.68bn

• IGR in 2015 N18.08bn

• IGR in 2016 N14.24bn

• Total Debt Stock as at Dec 31, 2016 N70.86bn

SECTORAL ASSESSMENT

• Agriculture: After the Ukpabi Nimbo attack, Ugwanyi moved to protect farmlands in Enugu State – Average

• Education: Impact in education is being felt – Above Average

• Health Care: Impact in health is being felt – Above Average

• Infrastructure: Strong in infrastructure development  – Good

• Ease of Doing Business: Efforts to attract investments through privatisation and commercialization – Good

• Security: Attacks by herdsmen have been curtailed – Above Average

clear vision, promising start:

Gombe State

Ibrahim Dankwambo: the state needs more than infrastructure amidST poverty

Though he has covered many grounds, education has unarguably been Ibrahim Dankwambo’s priority in the last two years, constructing and renovating over 502 classrooms in both primary and secondary schools. He also built about 51 laboratories and purchased over 4,000 (three in one) desks for secondary schools.

He recruited over 1,000 university graduates and 1,000 NCE graduates to close the gap in shortage of teachers in both primary and secondary schools across the state. This improved the mathematics ratio from 1.2590 in 2010 to 1.146 in 2013, while English changed from 1.727 to 1.149.

To improve teaching quality, he created an Assurance Quality Department and trained over 3,918 teachers, consisting of 888 for junior secondary and 3,030 for primary school. The results have been noteworthy with the enrolment of 2,000 students for remedial programmes in collaboration with the University of Maiduguri in which 55 per cent have gained admission in to the university. He also sent 20 students overseas for maritime degree programmes.

Notwithstanding the inroads Dankwambo might have made in education, Gombe remains one of the most backward states in the country. Being in the North-east, Gombe had its fair share of attacks by Boko Haram insurgents, resulting in a refugee (IDP) crisis that it must contend with. As it stands, its revenue, be it from FAAC or internal sources, is nothing to write home about, making it one of the unviable sub-national units of the federation.

gombe IN FIGURES

• FAAC Allocation (June 2015 – May 2016) N28.54bn

• FAAC Allocation (June 2016 – April 2017) N28.87bn

• IGR in 2015 N4.78bn

• IGR in 2016 N2.94bn

• Total Debt Stock as Dec 31, 2016 N49.85bn

SECTORAL ASSESSMENT

• Agriculture: No clarity on where Dankambo stands on agriculture – Poor

• Education: Education is a major priority under Dankwambo – Good

• Health Care: Some health care are ongoing but hamstrung by paucity of funds  – Below average

• Infrastructure: Urban and rural projects have been embarked upon – Above Average

• Ease of Doing Business: The spectre of the Boko Haram continues to limit investment in Gombe – Poor

• Security: Boko Haram continues to loom over the state – Poor

non-starter, go back to drawing board:

Imo state

Rochas Okorocha: high

expectations, no result

Rochas Okorocha’s stewardship in the last two years has been a mixed bag for many Imo residents, as they worry about the quality of infrastructure that the governor has provided. For many, the infrastructure is considered sub-standard. This is understandable given the fact that rehabilitation and construction works are largely handled by second-rate contractors that are appointed without due process or open competitive tenders. Many of the jobs, therefore, go bad shortly after inauguration.

Okorocha has also spent the last 12 months battling with labour unions and pensioners over his proposal that the latter should forfeit 60 per cent of their outstanding arrears. The petitioners have since sued him. The backlog of unpaid salaries in Imo State is another area that has led to confrontations with labour.

Also agitating the minds of the people is the ineffectiveness of the State House of Assembly that has been unable to check the excesses of the garrulous governor. With only four opposition PDP members out of 27, the legislature has become a mere appendage of the executive. Meanwhile, the impact of his effort to get public sector workers in his state to spend a certain number of days in the week in farmlands is yet to be seen.

Security of lives and property has, however, been given top priority by Okorocha’s administration, leading to a reduction in kidnapping and armed robberies. Education has also been pursued by the Okorocha government, especially at primary and secondary school levels, with the remodelling of several schools in the state.

Imo under Okorocha is also contending with a serious fiscal crisis. With the drop in oil prices, the state’s FAAC allocations dropped significantly while internal revenue generation has also taken a hit, falling from a peak of N8.1 billion in 2014 to N5.8 billion in 2016. Given its debt stock, it is apparent that Imo State’s debt service as a percentage of total revenue is unsustainable.

Imo IN FIGURES

• FAAC Allocation (June 2015 – May 2016) N35.78bn

• FAAC Allocation (June 2016 – April 2017) N34.43bn

• IGR in 2015 N5.47bn

• IGR in 2016 N5.87bn

• Total Debt Stock as Dec 31, 2016 N111.63bn

SECTORAL ASSESSMENT

• Agriculture: Impact of back-farm-order to workers is yet to be felt – Below Average

• Education: Education has been given priority under Okorocha – Average

• Health Care: There is no clarity on health care delivery in Imo  – Poor

• Infrastructure: Governor accused of delivering sub-standard projects – Poor

• Ease of Doing Business: No clarity on investment drive in Imo – Poor

• Security: Kidnappings and robberies have been curtailed – Above average

work in progress, no clear results:

Jigawa State

Muhammad Abubakar: reviving agriculture amidst poverty

Being a cardinal programme of his administration, Muhammad Abubakar has pursed agriculture with a single-minded devotion, establishing the interconnection between it and food security, poverty reduction, and the human and economic development of the state.

Under his agriculture support programme, apart from providing funding support for irrigation, the governor has also provided farmers with farming inputs, including improved seedling and fertilizer. This, he ensured, was extended to all the 27 local governments of the state. He also set aside funds for the containment of highly pathogenic avian influenza (bird flu) and distributed free goats to women to encourage animal husbandry.

However, Badaru has little on his mid-term report card in the area of infrastructure development, as he persistently complained of paucity of funds to deliver projects for his people. This was evident in the state’s dwindling IGR in 2016.

Jigawa IN FIGURES

• FAAC Allocation (June 2015 – May 2016) N39.63bn

• FAAC Allocation (June 2016 – April 2017) N37.27bn

• IGR in 2015 N5.08bn

• IGR in 2016 N3.54bn

• *Debt Stock – N19bn as at March 2016; $32.42m as at Dec 2016

* Figure denominated in dollars is the state’s external debt stock

SECTORAL ASSESSMENT

• Agriculture: Considerable emphasis laid on agriculture – Above Average

• Education: Paucity of funds to deliver in education – Poor

• Health Care: Paucity of funds to deliver in health care – Poor

• Infrastructure: Paucity of funds to deliver on infrastructure – Poor

• Ease of Doing Business: No clarity on investment drive in Jigawa – Poor

• Security: Peace has prevailed in the state – Above average

work in progress, no clear results:

Kaduna State

Nasir el-Rufai came to office with a resolve to make Kaduna great again, promising to revamp education, boost healthcare, ensure security, provide basic infrastructure, and institute good governance and a responsive public service with zero tolerance for corruption.

He set off by seeking to reduce the cost of governance and rationalised the state’s 24 ministries to 13, following up with a series of workers’ verification exercises that led to the flushing out of ghost workers and reduction of the wage bill by about N500 million monthly.

He introduced free basic education and free feeding in primary schools. The feeding programme, which gulped N1.1 billion monthly has, however, been suspended because of paucity of funds.

He recruited over 2,200 secondary school teachers and spent N5 billion on school modernisation and renovation. Another N80 million was expended on the training of teachers.

El-Rufai is rejuvenating the health care system through a partnership with General Electric for the upgrade and equipping of 255 primary health centres and 23 secondary health centres across the state. He has equally wooed investors to set up agro-allied businesses in his state such as tomato processing factories and rice mills so that farmers in his states can have ready markets for their produce.

The governor also did not rest on his oars when the Kaduna airport was made the alternative to the Abuja airport, when the latter was closed for six weeks. He worked with the security forces to provide adequate security in the city and on all the routes exiting Kaduna. Owing to the rehabilitation of the Kaduna airport, he is wooing Ethiopian Airways to make the airport its hub in North-west Nigeria.

A major sore point for him, however, has been the violent clashes in Southern Kaduna between indigenes and Hausa-Fulani herdsmen, which has claimed thousands of lives, with the former accusing the governor of bias.

Another cause for sleepless nights is the state’s external debt stock put at $222.9 billion, making it the second highest after Lagos State. With the devaluation of the naira, el-Rufai faces the onerous task of servicing external loans that could bankrupt the state. Despite the significant improvement in internal revenue generation between 2015 and 2016, predominantly from PAYE, the governor would still need to sweat the assets in his state to more than triple his current IGR of N17 billion per annum for sustainability.

Kaduna IN FIGURES

• FAAC Allocation (June 2015 – May 2016) N45.57bn

• FAAC Allocation (June 2016 – April 2017) N42.70bn

• IGR in 2015 N11.54bn

• IGR in 2016 N17.05bn

• Total Debt Stock as Dec 31, 2016 N131.26bn

SECTORAL ASSESSMENT

• Agriculture: Considerable emphasis on agro-allied factories – Good

• Education: Considerable investment in education – Good

• Health Care: Considerable investment in health care – Good

• Infrastructure: Roll out of urban renewal projects in the state capital and other towns in the state – Good

• Ease of Doing Business: Restructured public sector for efficiency and hosted investment and economic summits to attract businesses to the state – Good

• Security: Cattle rustling, the Southern Kaduna killings and kidnappings are a blemish on el-Rufai’s record – Poor

clear vision, promising start:

Kano State

Abdullahi Ganduje:

slow and steady

Dr. Abdullahi Ganduje came to office with a 12-point blueprint to consolidate on his predecessor’s infrastructure milestones. But he found that money would be a challenge to the attainment of his objectives.

With dwindling proceeds from the Federation Account, the governor had to reform the state Board of Internal Revenue for improved revenue generation.

He then turned his attention to expanding the infrastructure of the state, constructing and rehabilitating roads and bridges he felt would facilitate economic growth. They include the underpass at Bukavu Barracks Junction, Katsina Road-Kofar Ruwa – Kabuga Road, Aminu Kano Way-Katsina, and Sheik Jafar Road-Panshekara by the Madobi junction underpass.

He also given attention to education and placed emphasis on completion of capital projects at the Kano University of Science and Technology, among others. Ganduje further impacted on health care delivery with his focus on the prevalence of HIV/AIDS, polio and malaria. He has also trained 1,936 traditional health attendants on effective maternal health care service.

However, Kano, the commercial capital of Northern Nigeria, remains a shadow of its former self. Several of the industries in the Sharada Industrial Layout remain closed, robbing the state of job opportunities for its teeming population. Although Ganduje has embarked on investment roadshows to attract investments to the state, this has been slow in coming, making the state over-reliant on handouts from the centre.

Ganduje, nonetheless, must be given credit for revamping the state’s Board of Internal Revenue, as this has seen his state’s IGR jump from N13.61 billion to N31 billion. But with a population of 11.36 million (2014 estimates) and lower FAAC allocations, the Ganduje administration must improve its revenue drive to provide the infrastructure and amenities for the rising demographic of the state.

Kano IN FIGURES

• FAAC Allocation (June 2015 – May 2016) N57.18bn

• FAAC Allocation (June 2016 – April 2017) N54.37bn

• IGR in 2015 N13.61bn

• IGR in 2016 N31bn

• Total Debt Stock as Dec 31, 2016 N111.5bn

SECTORAL ASSESSMENT

• Agriculture: No clarity yet on Ganduje’s agriculture policy – Above Average

• Education: Considerable investment in education – Good

• Health Care: Considerable investment in health care – Good

• Infrastructure: Roll out of urban renewal projects in the state capital and other towns in the state – Good

• Ease of Doing Business: No attempt made to revive the Sharada Industrial Layout – Improving

• Security: Relative peace in Kano since the Boko Haram insurgency was degraded – Above Average

good vision, slow start:

Katsina State

Bello Masari:

calm and stable

Perhaps because of his background as a water engineer, Bello Masari has pumped a lot of funds into the provision of water both for domestic consumption and irrigation for farming. Available records show that he earmarked N12.3 billion for the completion and rehabilitation of dams to boost water supply and irrigation. He also set aside N1.3 billion for the drilling of boreholes in all the wards across the 34 local government areas of the state.

Masari has also paid attention to education, renovating over 1,800 dilapidated primary schools across the state, even as he procured tables, chairs and teaching and learning aids for schools in President Muhammadu Buhari’s home state. In addition, he has made sure that teachers are routinely recruited to augment the alarming dearth of teachers across primary and post-primary schools in Katsina. He has also embarked on infrastructure upgrades needed for the accreditation of courses at the tertiary institutions.

But a lot more needs to be done in the quiet, rustic state that has produced two presidents under the current democratic dispensation. Agriculture is one area with considerable potential that Masari is focusing on, but this has not quite impacted on its revenue base.

Katsina IN FIGURES

• FAAC Allocation (June 2015 – May 2016) N43.31bn

• FAAC Allocation (June 2016 – April 2017) N40.33bn

• IGR in 2015 N5.79bn

• IGR in 2016 N5.55bn

• *Debt Stock – N21.45bn as at March 2016; $68.1m as at Dec 2016

* Figure denominated in dollars is the state’s external debt stock

SECTORAL ASSESSMENT

• Agriculture: Major emphasis on agriculture production – Good

• Education: Considerable investment in education – Good

• Health Care: Considerable investment in health care – Good

• Infrastructure: Some infrastructure projects in the state capital and other towns in the state – Average

• Ease of Doing Business: No clarity on what Masiri in the area of ease of doing business Katsina – Poor

• Security: Relative peace in Katsina – Good

clear vision, promising start:

Kebbi State

Atiku Bagudu:

promising performance

Since his emergence as Kebbi State governor in 2015, Atiku Bagudu’s profile has risen through improved governance by ensuring a decentralised bureaucracy that works efficiently to meet his development goals.

Agriculture, being the main focus of his administration, has received huge funds and considerable attention for farmers across the state. By accessing the Anchor Borrowers’ Programme, Bagudu was able to engage many youths and over 70,000 rice and wheat farmers across the state.

Today, Kebbi has created a growing breed of middle class rice and wheat farmers that are lifting their families out of poverty. Kebbi’s joint venture rice project with the Lagos State Government is also worthy of mention, and has paved the path for collaborative ventures by discerning state governments.

His laudable efforts in agriculture have not gone unnoticed. Kebbi today is attracting investors seeking to set up rice processing mills to meet domestic demand for the food staple, with an eye on exports to neighbouring countries in the foreseeable future.

In the area of infrastructure, the Bagudu administration has constructed several roads in the state capital and rural areas, opening up communities, which were once inaccessible. His goal is to ease the transportation of farm produce from the state to other states of the federation.

Bagudu has also deployed resources to make health service delivery affordable, even as education and job creation get priority attention from his administration.

Although Kebbi has a relatively low debt profile, the drop in revenue from the Federation Account and internal sources need to be addressed. With the emergence of a viable agriculture and food processing industry, Bagudu needs to reform and reinvigorate the revenue drive in his state.

Kebbi IN FIGURES

• FAAC Allocation (June 2015 – May 2016) N36.30bn

• FAAC Allocation (June 2016 – April 2017) N33.84bn

• IGR in 2015 N3.59bn

• IGR in 2016 N3.13bn

• Total Debt Stock as Dec 31, 2016 N34.71bn

SECTORAL ASSESSMENT

• Agriculture: Bagudu’s agriculture programme is unrivalled on the country, leading to the creation of a new breed of middle class rice and wheat farmers in his state – Excellent

• Education: Considerable investment in education – Good

• Health Care: Considerable investment in health care – Good

• Infrastructure: Roll out of urban renewal projects in the state capital and other towns in the state – Good

• Ease of Doing Business: His programmes are attracting investors from India and China in the agriculture sector – Good

• Security: Relative peace in Kebbi – Above Average

clear vision, promising start:

Kogi State

Yahaya Bello: confused and yet

to grapple with governance

Despite the verification exercise of civil servants embarked upon by Yahaya Bello on assumption of office 17 months ago, which save Kogi State an estimated N1.5 billion monthly, the governor has not been able to pay his workers for several months. By his own admission, the state has a backlog running to 12 months.

Last year, the governor kicked off a road construction programme to cost N10 billion in the three senatorial districts in the state. In Kogi Central District, the roads to be constructed include the 18.3 kilometre-long Agassa-Ahache-Upogoro road, Ogaminana-Ebogogo road, Itape-Eika-Kuroko road and Obehira-Ihima-Obangede road awarded at the cost of N3.819 billion.  Also to receive attention are the Iyamoye-Jege-Ife-Olukotun-Ponyan-Ejuku-Ijowa Isanlu roads and Ekirin-Ade-Ohun-Ifeolukotun roads all in Kogi West district, awarded at the cost of N4 billion. While in Kogi East district, work is to commence on the Anyigba-Umomi-Akpagidigbo-Ugwolawo-Ajaka road, Ankpa township road, Ibana-Okpo road and Ikeje-Ogugu-Ette road, awarded at the cost of 2.84 billion. Given the paucity of funds in the state, it is uncertain how many of these states he has delivered to the people in the senatorial zones.

His idea on providing food security is to declare an emergency in the agriculture. But no investments have been made by the state government or investors in the sector since Bello assumed office. He has vowed to reposition education in the state, but no investment has been made by the state government in this regard.

Kidnappings and armed robberies remain a problem in Kogi under Bello’s watch, while the state’s reputation for harbouring Boko Haram sympathisers or members is problem that has not been addressed.

Kogi IN FIGURES

• FAAC Allocation (June 2015 – May 2016) N36.72bn

• FAAC Allocation (June 2016 – April 2017) N34.89bn

• IGR in 2015 N6.78bn

• IGR in 2016 N9.75bn

• Total Debt Stock as Dec 31, 2016 N81.12bn

SECTORAL ASSESSMENT

• Agriculture: Bello’s agriculture programme is unclear – Poor

• Education: No clarity on investment in education – Poor

• Health Care: No clarity on investment in health care – Poor

• Infrastructure: Roll out of road projects state – Average

• Ease of Doing Business: No clarity on ease of doing business in Kogi – Poor

• Security: Kidnapping and robberies remain a security concern in Kogi – Poor

non-starter, go back to drawing board:

Kwara State

Abdulfatah Ahmed:

steady and stable

Abdulfatah Ahmed’s midterm report shows an appreciable impact on the lives of the people of Kwara State, particularly in education, health, infrastructure projects and employment generation.

His task was made easier by his banking background, which equipped him with the capacity to financially reengineer the state and restructure the state’s internal revenue service.

Among his ongoing projects are the underpass at Geri-Alimi roundabout, dualisation of the Ganmo-Olunlade junction, dualisation of University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital-Sango area, and Operation Light-up Kwara.

His administration has also rehabilitated five general hospitals in Ilorin, Share, Kaima, Offa and Omu-Aran with modern equipment.

Ahmed has commenced the building of the campuses of the state-owned university at Ilesha-Baruba and Osi as part of efforts to bring education to the doorsteps of the people of the state. The Ajase-Ipo International Vocation and Skills Acquisition Center has also taken off to reduce unemployment among the unemployed youths in the state.

Ahmed has also sustained the agriculture policies of his predecessor, which wooed farmers from Zimbabwe to set up Shonga farms. Today, the farms provide poultry, milk, processed cassava, soya bean, maize and rice and ginger to WAMCO, Kentucky Fried Chicken in Lagos, and food produce to Shoprite. Through the farms up to 3,000-4,000 are employed during the harvesting season. Residents in the neighboring villages enjoy power supply, water and access to healthcare facilities. Several investors like WAMCO and Olam are currently operating in Kwara, creating employment opportunities for its residents, while several others are showing interest in investing in the state’s agricultural sector. Through the farms, Ahmed is now targeting the export market.

However, the non-completion of the Ilorin water project has remained a major setback in the efforts of the administration to make pipe borne water available in the state capital, Ilorin.

Ahmed must be credited with significantly improving IGR in his state in one year, but more needs to done to meet its obligations to creditors and its workers.

Kwara IN FIGURES

• FAAC Allocation (June 2015 – May 2016) –

• FAAC Allocation (June 2016 – April 2017) –

• IGR in 2015 N7.2bn

• IGR in 2016 N17.25bn

• Total Debt Stock as Dec 31, 2016 N53.1bn

SECTORAL ASSESSMENT

• Agriculture: Kwara’s investment in Shonga farms has been sustained by Ahmed – Good

• Education: Considerable investment in education – Good

• Health Care: Considerable investment in health care – Good

• Infrastructure: Roll out of urban renewal projects in the state capital and other towns in the state – Good

• Ease of Doing Business: No clarity on ease of doing business in Kwara – Improving

• Security: Relative peace in Ilorin, but communal clashes outside the city persist – Average

good vision, slow start:

Lagos State

Akinwunmi Ambode: a pair

of safe and steady hands

Despite governing the fifth largest economy on the African continent, Akinwunmi Ambode assumed office amid diverse challenges. Aside the recession that held down most states of the federation, Ambode was confronted with the heinous traffic congestion, which according to the security agencies, fostered a reign of traffic robbers across the state. Although this remains a nightmare in Lagos, his continuous funding of the Nigeria Police and introduction of a neighbourhood security outfit may lead to reduction in crime in Nigeria’s commercial nerve centre, as kidnapping and robberies remain a challenge in several suburbs in the state.

Ambode has also focused on the challenges in the public service in Lagos by implementing public sector reforms under which the state’s ministries, department and agencies (MDAs) were realigned for optimal performance. Subsequently, all MDAs, which were operating from rented premises, were relocated to government buildings and facilities. The reform saved the government about N3 billion.

Next, Ambode expanded the tax net and revenue sources in Lagos, generating over N25 billion monthly in 2016 with a projection of N30 billion for this year. With more resources, he has inaugurated 114 roads across the state, which his administration constructed in partnership with 20 local government areas (LGAs) and 37 local council development areas (LCDAs). Besides, he unveiled the Abesan-Aboru Link Bridge and seven other roads, including the two flyovers at Abule-Egba and Ajah, which eliminated the traffic gridlock around the areas.

Despite the laudable efforts by Ambode, the general thinking is that he may be stretching himself thin. With a population of 12 million (2014 estimates), over-stretched facilities and rising unemployment, Lagos’ revenue profile is realistically too low to catapult the state into a modern city-state of Western or Asian standards. The attempt to kick-off the Fourth Mainland Bridge just got canned, while the state continues to struggle to complete just one line of its monorail project.

Instructively, the devaluation of the naira has impacted on the state’s ability to deliver on some of these multi-billion naira projects and has seen its GDP drop to $91 billion. But the state still possesses considerable potential that remains untapped. Like the federal government, Lagos must pursue and implement the ease of doing business policy in the state, as the state currently ranks as one of the most difficult places to do business and live in among megacities worldwide.

The state must also streamline and lower taxes to attract investments and create new jobs that will increase its revenue base. Several parts of the state such as Apapa are blighted and suffering from absolute neglect, effectively robbing Lagos of additional revenue. Another area of concern is the state’s environmental problem. Keeping the state and its waterways clean and free of solid waste has remained a challenge for successive administrations. Ambode has not fared better than his colleagues in this department and it’s an area he needs to address.

A cursory glance at the state’s debt service as a percentage of revenue shows that the state can meet its obligations to local and external creditors. However, the devaluation of the naira has meant more strain on its finances in terms of servicing its foreign debt.

lagos IN FIGURES

• FAAC Allocation (June 2015 – May 2016) N92.54bn

• FAAC Allocation (June 2016 – April 2017) N93.40bn

• IGR in 2015 N268.22bn

• IGR in 2016 N302.43bn

• Total Debt Stock as Dec 31, 2016 N732.85bn

SECTORAL ASSESSMENT

• Agriculture: Lagos has entered into a joint venture with the Kebbi State Government for rice production; it is working on similar joint projects with other states – Good

• Education: Considerable investment in education – Good

• Health Care: Considerable investment in health care – Good

• Infrastructure: Roll out of urban renewal projects across the state – Excellent

• Ease of Doing Business: Multiplicity of taxes, traffic gridlocks, over-stretched makes Lagos a challenge to do business in – Above Average

• Security: Ambode has kept the state relatively safe, but kidnappings persist – Above Average despite some challenges

clear vision, promising start:

Nasarawa State

Tanko Al-Makura: pulling

below his weight

Re-elected two years ago, Tanko Al-Makura’s second term reflects the seeming complacency that followed his first term, as he lurched from one controversy to the other to the detriment of the state. Al-Makura’s second stint has been mired in frequent clashes with labour unions over unpaid salaries, among other issues.

From the onset of his second term, he was greeted with a protracted industrial crisis by the academic union at the Nasarawa State University in Keffi, leading to the closure of the institution for about nine months. The Nigerian Union of Local Government Employees (NULGE), National Union of Teachers and the Nigerian Labour Congress (NLC) have all also taken turns to embark on industrial actions.

Notwithstanding the turbulent industrial relations environment, he started some new projects, including the controversial cargo airport in Lafia and the construction of township roads across the state. When THISDAY visited the site of the Cargo Airport last week, which was flagged off with much fanfare recently, nothing of note had been achieved.

Despite its proximity to the Federal Capital Territory, Abuja, Al-Makura has failed to leverage on this comparative advantage for his state. He has failed to ensure that PAYE taxes of hundreds of thousands of workers who work in Abuja but live in satellite towns in Nasarawa, are paid to the of his state’s coffer. The absence of adequate infrastructure and industrial hubs in Nasarawa has made the state an unattractive investment destination for businesses that can service Abuja.

With Al-Makura’s inability to catapult the state to its full potential, it is little wonder that Nasarawa is fast becoming one of the unviable sub-national units of the federation.

nasarawa IN FIGURES

• FAAC Allocation (June 2015 – May 2016) N31.42bn

• FAAC Allocation (June 2016 – April 2017) N29.65bn

• IGR in 2015 N4.28bn

• IGR in 2016 N3.4bn

• Total Debt Stock as Dec 31, 2016 N76.12bn

SECTORAL ASSESSMENT

• Agriculture: No clarity on Al-Makura’s programmes on agriculture – Poor

• Education: No clarity on investment in education – Poor

• Health Care: No clarity on investment in health care – Poor

• Infrastructure: Some roll out of urban renewal projects – Average

• Ease of Doing Business: No clarity on ease of doing business – Poor

• Security: Relative peace in Nasarawa – Average

non-starter, go back to drawing board:

Niger State

Sani Bello: the jury

is still out

Sani Bello has made slow but steady progress in Niger State, his major focus being road construction, especially in the state capital and other major towns. Roads which were hitherto impassable have been made motorable while new ones have been constructed. Water supply, which had become an intractable problem has also received attention, as high and low lift pumps were procured for the Chinchaga Water Works in Minna, the state capital.  Utility standby generators have also been purchased and installed to power the pumps. With this, water supply to parts of the state capital has improved a little.

Security has, however, remained a serious challenge, as several lives and property have been lost to cattle rustlers and armed robbers who invaded several local government areas especially in the Niger East Senatorial District.

In all, the home state of two military heads of state and Zungeru, once the capital of the British protectorate of Northern Nigeria, has little to show for its rich heritage. Bello will have to redouble efforts to drive revenue generation from the rich resources in his state.

Niger IN FIGURES

• FAAC Allocation (June 2015 – May 2016) N37.42bn

• FAAC Allocation (June 2016 – April 2017) N37.59bn

• IGR in 2015 N5.98bn

• IGR in 2016 N5.88bn

• Total Debt Stock as Dec 31, 2016 N45.81bn

SECTORAL ASSESSMENT

• Agriculture: No clarity on Bello’s programmes on agriculture – Poor

• Education: Focus on investment in education – Average

• Health Care: Focus on investment in health care – Average

• Infrastructure: Roll out of urban renewal projects – Above Average

• Ease of Doing Business: No clarity on ease of doing business – Poor

• Security: Concerns over communal clashes and clashes between herdsmen and communities persist – Poor

work in progress, no clear results:

Ogun State

Ibikunle Amosun: strong

and able leadership

Ibikunle Amosun’s strides have been mainly in roads construction that cut across the three senatorial districts of the state. The governor constructed and delivered the first ever overhead bridge in Abeokuta and fixed some other roads in the metropolis. This was embraced with mixed feelings because of the demolition of several properties to pave the way for road expansion. But some the road expansion projects turned out to be white elephants, as they were abandoned more than a year ago.

However, the governor has inaugurated some of the projects, including the Ijebu Ode flyover, Iyana Mortuary flyover and road, Sapon and Itoku shopping malls, a spare parts mall, and Omida market complex. But the rural areas have hardly been touched by his administration, even as most of his electoral promises are yet to be met.

Amosun’s government, however, has sustained its investment drive that attracted some 100 industries to the state in the last 24 months. This was reflected in the state’s IGR, which more than doubled from N34.6 billion in 2015 to N73 billion in 2016. The state’s debt, nonetheless, is something Amosun must watch. With the naira devaluation and an external debt overhang of $103.4m, servicing the state’s foreign obligations is bound to dent a hole in the state’s coffers.

Ogun IN FIGURES

• FAAC Allocation (June 2015 – May 2016) N30.88bn

• FAAC Allocation (June 2016 – April 2017) N27.88bn

• IGR in 2015 N34.6bn

• IGR in 2016 N73bn

• *Debt Stock – $103.42m as at Dec 2016; N75.92bn as at Dec 2015

* Figure denominated in dollars is the state’s external debt stock

SECTORAL ASSESSMENT

• Agriculture: No clarity on Amosun’s programmes on agriculture – Poor

• Education: Considerable investment in education – Good

• Health Care: Considerable investment in health care – Good

• Infrastructure: Roll out of urban renewal projects across the state – Good

• Ease of Doing Business: Fewer taxes, less congestion, investment roadshows, and its proximity to Lagos have lured several businesses to Ogun State – Good

• Security: Relative peace in Ogun, but kidnapping is a concern – Average

clear vision, promising start:

Ondo State

Rotimi Akeredolu:

the jury is still out

At his inaugural speech two months ago, Rotimi Akeredolu anchored his blueprint on five cardinal programmes, which he termed Platforms for Change. These are: job creation through agriculture, entrepreneurship and industrialisation; massive infrastructure development and maintenance; provision of functional education and technological growth; provision of accessible and qualitative health care and social service delivery; and rural development and community extension services.

According to the governor, his Platform for Change is erected on strong pillars, which consist of the core sectors of government activities that his blueprint lays emphasis on. These are finance and management of state resources, health and social services, infrastructure and public utilities, agriculture and natural resources, commerce and Industrial development, education and technology, land, housing and environment, women affairs and social development, youth and sports development, culture and tourism as well as information, civic orientation and mobilisation among others.

However, Akeredolu has taken over a state that has a backlog of unpaid salaries and pensions. His blueprint also touches on every sector, which the limited resources of the state can hardly meet.

Ondo IN FIGURES

• FAAC Allocation (June 2015 – May 2016) N40.31bn

• FAAC Allocation (June 2016 – April 2017) N45.37bn

• IGR in 2015 N10.09bn

• IGR in 2016 N8.68bn

• Total Debt Stock as Dec 31, 2016 N68.27bn

SECTORAL ASSESSMENT

• Agriculture: Akeredolu’s programmes still in the works – Below Average

• Education: Programme on education still in the works – Below Average

• Health Care: Programme on health care still in the works – Below Average

• Infrastructure: Governor has rolled out plans for infrastructure – Average

• Ease of Doing Business: No clarity on ease of doing business – Poor

• Security: Relative peace in Ondo – Above Average

work in progress, no clear results:

Osun State

Rauf Aregbesola: punching below his weight, high expectations not so high results

Rauf Aregbesola has managed to rule his state without a cabinet for close to three years, as a cost saving measure. That should come as no surprise, as Osun has continued to fall behind on its payments to workers despite all the bailouts and handouts from the federal government.

That the state’s finances are in a mess is an understatement. Its statutory allocations from the Federation Account are the lowest in the country due to loan massive deductions from source. Indeed, it is a miracle that the governor has been able to deliver on projects ranging from roads, schools and health facilities in his state. Aregbesola has commissioned model schools in places like Osogbo, Iyoye Ijesa and Ede. In roads construction, he has built the 30km Gbongan-Akoda Road, Adebisi Akande Trumpet Interchange Bridge, and rehabilitated the 30.20km Gbongan-Iwo-Oyo Road,

Aregbesola’s administration has also committed to investment more in cocoa and other agriculture produce to improve internal revenue generation in the state. In this regard, 60 million “active” cocoa trees were identified for the production of “Cocoa Omoluabi in the state and signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Ibadan, to boost its cocoa production.

Aregbesola, nonetheless, governs a state that is in a financial mess. It remains to be see how the governor, with barely a left to his tenure can make a difference.

Osun IN FIGURES

• FAAC Allocation (June 2015 – May 2016) N21.71bn

• FAAC Allocation (June 2016 – April 2017) N21.96bn

• IGR in 2015 N8.07bn

• IGR in 2016 N8.88bn

• Total Debt Stock as Dec 31, 2016 N168.6bn

SECTORAL ASSESSMENT

• Agriculture: Targeting increased cocoa production – Good

• Education: Considerable investment in education – Good

• Health Care: Some investment in health care – Average

• Infrastructure: Roll out of road projects across the state – Average

• Ease of Doing Business: No clarity on ease of doing business – Poor

• Security: Relative peace in Osun – Average

work in progress, no clear results:

Oyo State

Abiola Ajimobi:

Calm and steady

By his own assessment, the greatest achievement of Abiola Ajimobi is the peace that has pervaded the state since he came to office six years ago. As his second term hits the half way mark, he could give himself a pat on the back in this department.

Some of his midterm accomplishments include the ongoing expansion and rehabilitation of Beere, Orita-Merin, Agbeni-Ogunpa Road, dualisation of Idi-Ape-Akobo-Odogbo Barracks Road, Agodi-Gate-Old Ife-Adegbayi Road, a with spur to Alakia-Ibadan Airport, as well as the dualisation of Saki township roads in the Oke Ogun area of the state. His government has also approved the reconstruction of 10-km Eleyele-Akufo Road, rehabilitation of Akufo Junction-Eruwa Road, and expansion of the Oke-Adu-Agodi-Gate-Idi-Ape- Iwo Road interchange.

Workers, however, do unhappy with the governor because their salaries are several months in arrears, even as poor funding remains the bane of tertiary institutions in Oyo.

But while Ajimobi may be satisfied with the peace in his state, the slow transformation of Ibadan, the state capital and old capital of the defunct Western Region, leaves much to be desired.

Oyo IN FIGURES

• FAAC Allocation (June 2015 – May 2016) N39.55bn

• FAAC Allocation (June 2016 – April 2017) N38.19bn

• IGR in 2015 N15.66bn

• IGR in 2016 N18.88bn

• Total Debt Stock as Dec 31, 2016 N137.82bn

SECTORAL ASSESSMENT

• Agriculture: No clarity on Ajomobi’s programmes on agriculture – Poor

• Education: No clarity on investment in education – Improving

• Health Care: No clarity on investment in health care – Poor

• Infrastructure: Roll out of urban renewal projects across the state – Good

• Ease of Doing Business: No clarity on ease of doing business – Improving

• Security: Relative peace in Oyo, but kidnapping is a concern – Above Average

work in progress, no clear results:

Plateau State

Solomon Lalong: punching

below his weight

For Simon Lalong, the restoration of peace in the hitherto restive state is the highpoint of his midterm scorecard. He had on assumption of office spoken with and appealed to all warring factions to make peace with one another, giving appointments to many Hausa-Fulani settlers.

Many citizens have also given kudos to Lalong for enhancing the accreditation of the courses run by the Plateau State University, Bokkos, which received little or no attention from the previous administration. The university, which had graduated about two sets of students, could not send them for the mandatory NYSC because its courses had not been accredited.

However, not much has been achieved by his government in primary and secondary education. Generally praised for being up to date with workers’ salaries, not a few persons have expressed misgivings about his failure to conduct local government elections as mandated by the 1999 Constitution.

However, for a state rich in mineral and agricultural resources and huge tourism potential, Lalong could be considered to be underperforming. The state’s revenue drive is nothing to write home about, with its viability as a sub-national unit currently under threat.

Plateau IN FIGURES

• FAAC Allocation (June 2015 – May 2016) N31.04bn

• FAAC Allocation (June 2016 – April 2017) N30.25bn

• IGR in 2015 N6.94bn

• IGR in 2016 N9.19bn

• Total Debt Stock as Dec 31, 2016 N119.23bn

SECTORAL ASSESSMENT

• Agriculture: No clarity on Lalong’s programmes on agriculture – Poor

• Education: Low investment in education – Below Average

• Health Care: No clarity on investment in health care – Poor

• Infrastructure: Roll out of urban renewal projects across the state – Average


• Ease of Doing Business: No clarity on ease of doing business – Poor

• Security: Relative peace in Plateau – Above Average

work in progress, no clear results:

Rivers State

Nyesom Wike: distracted by needless controversies, could do much better

By Nigerian standards, the number of projects on display in River State belie the drawn out court battles, political shenanigans and election reruns that have characterised governance since Nyesom Wike assumed office two years ago.

From the minute he was sworn in, he set out to make a point and prove the naysayers wrong. As a result, it is difficult for a week pass by without the governor either laying the foundation of a project or inaugurating one. This has earned him the appellation, Mr. Project, given to him by acting President Yemi Osinbajo. Former President Goodluck Jonathan, while inaugurating the second Nkogu Bridge a little less than two weeks ago, described the state as a big construction site with projects in all parts of the state. The projects have not been limited to state projects, as the governor has included federal institutions like the Federal High Court and National Industrial Court, among others on his list.

The state under his watch has also witnessed relative peace, except during electioneering, and good industrial relations as workers get paid as and when due, while retirees get their pensions. The amnesty programme he initiated and the state’s logistic support to security agencies has helped reduce the incidence of cult war, kidnappings and crime in the state.

Irrespective of Wike’s efforts, Rivers State, with the highest population in the South-south zone, has too many restive youths that are prone to militancy and taking to the creeks. This means that the governor must redouble efforts to train, empower and create jobs for these youths to take them off the streets. The state’s over-reliance on oil revenue has also stunted its internal revenue drive. Several sectors in the state, ranging from its water economy and aquaculture, to agriculture and tourism, remain untapped. Like Lagos, the state also has environmental challenges that Wike has failed to address, while Port Harcourt, the capital city, remains nothing more than a glorified township, devoid of state-of-the art infrastructure and a skyline that reflect the oil wealth of the state.

Rivers IN FIGURES

• FAAC Allocation (June 2015 – May 2016) N87.62bn

• FAAC Allocation (June 2016 – April 2017) N106.36bn

• IGR in 2015 N82.10bn

• IGR in 2016 N85.29bn

• *Debt Stock – S48.25m as at Dec 2016; N142.42bn as at June 2016

* Figure denominated in dollars is the state’s external debt stock

SECTORAL ASSESSMENT

• Agriculture: No clarity on Wike’s programmes on agriculture – Poor

• Education: Massive investment in education – Good

• Health Care: Massive investment in health care – Good

• Infrastructure: Massive oll out of urban renewal projects across the state – Excellent

• Ease of Doing Business: No clarity on ease of doing business – Poor

• Security: Relative peace in Rivers – Above Average

clear vision, promising start:

Sokoto State

Aminu Tambuwal:

stable and promising

Aminu Tambuwal has given priority to education by allocating 28 per cent of his budget to the sector. The government under his watch is rehabilitating 235 primary schools across the state with over N3.6 billion. New ones are also being constructed.

Tambuwal is applying a scientific approach to agriculture with the State Technical Committee on Resuscitation of Agriculture active in capturing the data of all farmers across the state and ensuring intervention in the critical agricultural areas considered urgent to yield the desired result.

Government has also provided fertilizer to farmers at 75 per cent subsidy and distributed water pumps, seedlings and other farm inputs worth several billions of naira to grow its agro-economy. At least 27,166 jobs have been created through various interventions in sustainable agriculture and rural enterprise development in the last two years.

Tambuwal has, in addition, fostered a good relationship with the House of Assembly and the judiciary. As such, there has been no acrimony among the legislators, who have been supportive of the executive.

Yet, Sokoto, the seat of the Caliphate, could do better under Tambuwal. The once serene state has lost a lot of its charm, which the governor has to regain. Despite the scotching heat, the state, being the home of the Caliphate, has the capacity to attract tourists and Islamic scholars from far and wide coming to pay homage to the Sultanate. But investment, in conjunction with the private sector, must be made to make the capital attractive to investors and tourists alike.

SECTORAL ASSESSMENT

• FAAC Allocation (June 2015 – May 2016) N38.30bn

• FAAC Allocation (June 2016 – April 2017) N35.82bn

• IGR in 2015 N6.22bn

• IGR in 2016 N4.55bn

• Total Debt Stock as Dec 31, 2016 N34.58bn

Sokoto IN FIGURES

• Agriculture: Renewed focus on agriculture for extra revenue – Good

• Education: Emphasis on investment in education – Good

• Health Care: Emphasis on investment in health care – Above Average

• Infrastructure: Roll out of urban renewal projects across the state – Good

• Ease of Doing Business: No clarity on ease of doing business – Poor

• Security: Relative peace in Sokoto – Above Average

clear vision, promising start:

Taraba State

Darius Ishaku:

calm and stable

To successfully prosecute his Taraba Rescue Agenda, Ishaku had to tackle the challenge of the docility of the public sector and the plague of ghost workers that had eaten deep into the finances of the state by a whopping 80 per cent. That effort yielded monthly savings of N500m.

Next, he resuscitated moribund state-owned industries, including the Mambilla Beverages Company, Taraba Sugar Company, Baisa Timber Company, and Taraba Cassava Processing Company.

His administration has also obtained licenses for small-scale mining for the Taraba Solid Minerals Development Company and acquired 14 lease EPLs to commence joint venture exploitation in partnership with other companies.

His N2 billion Green House project, which has a daily production of 5 tonnes of cucumber, pepper, lettuce and tomatoes, is expected to generate employment and facilitate technology transfer to the state university and College of Agriculture both in Jalingo.

Taraba IN FIGURES

• FAAC Allocation (June 2015 – May 2016) N32.78bn

• FAAC Allocation (June 2016 – April 2017) 29.85bn

• IGR in 2015 N4.16bn

• IGR in 2016 N5.89bn

• Total Debt Stock as Dec 31, 2016 N45.56bn

SECTORAL ASSESSMENT

• Agriculture: Emphasis on agriculture – Good

• Education: No clarity on investment in education – Poor

• Health Care: No clarity on investment in health care – Poor

• Infrastructure: Roll out of urban renewal projects across the state – Average

• Ease of Doing Business: No clarity on ease of doing business – Poor

• Security: Herdsmen menace and regrouping of Boko Haram member is a concern – Below Average

work in progress, no clear results:

Yobe State

Ibrahim Gaidam: punching

below his weight

Buffeted by the Boko Haram insurgency and biting recession, Ibrahim Gaidam’s hands were virtually tied as he struggled to come to terms with the daunting task of rescuing the state from the grip of insecurity and poverty. Relief came last year with the downgrading of the insurgents by the military, giving him some breathing space to do some work.

His first port of call was the public sector that was a drain on the resources of the state. Streamlining the ministries and flushing out hundreds of ghost workers, he saved N20 billion.

With the savings, he could pay salaries and began to rebuild and rehabilitate infrastructure destroyed by the insurgents. He has introduced a comprehensive assistance plan for people displaced by Boko Haram to return to their homes.

He has also made moderate efforts at road construction, education, water, and health and youth empowerment. But like his counterpart in Borno, Gaidam needs all the help he can get to rebuild his state.

Yobe IN FIGURES

• FAAC Allocation (June 2015 – May 2016) N34.59bn

• FAAC Allocation (June 2016 – April 2017) N32.37bn

• IGR in 2015 N2.56bn

• IGR in 2016 N3.24bn

• Total Debt Stock as Dec 31, 2016 N22.3bn

SECTORAL ASSESSMENT

• Agriculture: No clarity on Gaidam’s programmes on agriculture – Poor

• Education: Some investment in education – Below Average

• Health Care: Some investment in health care – Below Average

• Infrastructure: Reconstruction and rehabilitation on going – Average

• Ease of Doing Business: No clarity on ease of doing business – Poor

• Security: Boko Haram remains a clear present danger – Poor

work in progress, no clear results:

Zamfara State

Abdulaziz Yari: distracted

by abuja politics

According education priority, Abdulaziz Yari has invested heavily in the sector, emphasising girl-child education. Subsequently, he has built and rehabilitated many schools for girls in Gusau, Talata Mafara and other local government areas in Zamfara State.

There have been instant results, as the enrolment of girls improved significantly, while the number of them completing their education up to secondary school certificate level has increased tremendously.

The governor has also given priority to water supply. He personally supervised the speedy completion of the N636 million Kaura-Namoda water treatment plant as well as another one in Gusau, the state capital. The completion of these projects has abated water scarcity in Gusau and Kaura-Namoda Local Government Areas.

The security situation in the state has, however, left much to be desired. In spite of the efforts of the military, cattle rustlers and bandits have continued to perpetrate their nefarious activities, especially in Anka, Maradun, Zurmi, Maru and Talata Mafara Local Government Areas, leading to the loss of lives and property.

Yari has picked fights with the legislature, leading to frosty relations, over the alleged misappropriation of the N11 billion bailout funds, a N1 billion agricultural loan released to the state by the Central Bank of Nigeria, and pension funds.

His state is one of the poorest in Nigeria and Yari has failed to take a cue from his neighbour in Kebbi who has opened up his economy to farming and agri-businesses. Yari’s performance, or lack thereof, has not been helped by the fact that he perambulates all over the country, especially in Abuja, by virtue of his position as Chairman of the Nigerian Governors’ Forum. This is a distraction he can really do without in order to focus seriously on the challenges in his state.

His statement on the meningitis outbreak in his state, which he said was God’s punishment for people’s sins, also drew derision from the public and exposed the absence of depth in his approach to governance.

Zamfara IN FIGURES

• FAAC Allocation (June 2015 – May 2016) N30.40bn

• FAAC Allocation (June 2016 – April 2017) N29.57bn

• IGR in 2015 N2.74bn

• IGR in 2016 N4.78bn

• Total Debt Stock as Dec 31, 2016 N68.57bn

SECTORAL ASSESSMENT

• Agriculture: No clarity on Yari’s programmes on agriculture – Above Average

• Education: Emphasis on girl-child education – Good

• Health Care: No clarity on investment in health care – Poor

• Infrastructure: Roll out of urban renewal projects across the state – Above Average

• Ease of Doing Business: No clarity on ease of doing business – Poor

• Security: Cattle rustling and banditry still not under control – Poor

work in progress, no clear results:

Culled From ThisDay’s Newspaper

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